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Thread: Town Meeting Blues

  1. #46
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    Nov 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by DHBernstein View Post
    For those readers wondering what "denial of service attack" means, here's an explanation.
    It is worth considering that the process we use now is essentially just like having a successful denial of service attack.

  2. #47
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    Dec 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by DHBernstein View Post
    Hundreds of Wayland citizens participated in last month's 4-session Annual Town Meeting.
    And thousands upon thousands upon thousands couldn't participate. What's your point? You and a few hundred of your cronies set it up so that you can control the vote, and now that everyone else is trying to get in on the act, you're raising a huge red DoS flag. Why don't you put some of your bile into solving the problem rather than just waving it like a red cape?

  3. #48
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    Mar 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kim Reichelt View Post
    It is worth considering that the process we use now is essentially just like having a successful denial of service attack.
    The process we use now does not lead Wayland citizens to believe that they can participate in Town Meeting votes from home, but then fail to ensure that they will be able to do so.

    Do you think Wayland's Moderator and the Secretary of the Commonwealth would approve even a trial of "Town Meeting voting from home" without assurance that home voters will actually be able to vote?

  4. #49
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    Mar 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carl Rosenblatt View Post
    And thousands upon thousands upon thousands couldn't participate. What's your point?
    The fact that hundreds of Wayland citizens participated in last month's 4-session Annual Town Meeting disproves your claim that "Except of course if you make voting a 5 day marathon event that no one has the time nor patience to endure."

    Quote Originally Posted by Carl Rosenblatt View Post
    You and a few hundred of your cronies set it up so that you can control the vote
    No one has the ability to "control the vote" at Town Meeting.

    Quote Originally Posted by Carl Rosenblatt View Post
    and now that everyone else is trying to get in on the act, you're raising a huge red DoS flag. Why don't you put some of your bile into solving the problem rather than just waving it like a red cape?
    In contrast to your continuous string of wild accusations and insults, I have posted no bile here.

    Did you not read the posted article explaining "denial of service attacks"? Do you not understand that the damage such attacks have caused over the past decade has created an enormous incentive to develop an effective defense -- and yet no effective defense has so far been developed?

    Throwing a tantrum won't get you an effective defense against denial of service attacks any more than it will get you an artificial intelligence or a cure for cancer. It's a hard problem that a lot of people have been working on for a long time without success.

  5. #50
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    Mar 2011
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    Estonian e-voting shouldn't be used in European elections, say security experts

    Conversations with several security engineers confirm that there is currently no practical out-of-the-box way to prevent internet-borne denial of service attacks. Hardware appliances can be setup to reject invalid packets, but these are expensive to acquire, configure, and maintain, and can be overwhelmed by a botnet of sufficient size.

    Conversations with several internet voting providers yielded none that can prevent proxy voting. One claimed a proprietary scheme that prevents denial of service attacks, but refused to describe it at any level of detail, saying this information could be used to circumvent the defense.

    A scheme that requires remote voters to possess a cellphone that can send and receive text messages, register their cellphone number with the Town before the start of a Town Meeting session", accept unique random codes sent at the start of a Town Meeting session and every X minutes thereafter, and include the most recent unique random code with each vote could limit proxy voting to one voter with possession of one or two cellphones other than his/her own. Text messaging may be significantly less vulnerable to denial of service attacks; I'm investigating this. We'd also need a means of receiving 1000 thousands (hopefully!) of text messages during a voting window, verifying that each contains the correct code, and tallying the vote. Text messaging does not yet provide a solution that meets our security, one-vote-per-voter, and usability requirements; besides its three-votes-per-voter characteristic, requiring remote voters to include a unique random code with each vote could be problematic for some Waylanders. But text messaging could be the kernel of a solution.

  6. #51
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    726

    Default Holding onto tradition, resistance to change and fear of the unknown...

    Just goes to show, everybody has their threshold for how much risk they are willing to take:

    Boston Globe article 5/21/14: Shift to voting machines

    Quote Originally Posted by Shift to voting machines
    “Some people in town are worried,” she said. “If they’ve always lived in Hudson, they’ve never voted any other way.”

    Selectman Fred Lucy said he understands the reasoning for the change, but he would have been OK with continuing to count ballots by hand.


    “I imagine if you were at a gathering on election night, you might wish it could have been reported earlier,” Lucy said. “But it works; think about the various problems around the country the last 15 years. Remember the hanging chads?”


    Selectman Joseph Durant, who serves as the board’s chairman, said the community had been slow in making the change partly because of controversies and uncertainty surrounding other methods of casting ballots and counting votes, but also because the town’s hand-counting system worked so reliably.


    “The voting process is sacred, this is the way it has been done forever,” he said. “We’re a little slow to change. It’s always been accurate, but the need to move forward has arrived. I guess it’s time for us to jump into the 21st century.”

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