Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Bye bye, bile? Websites try to nix nasty comments

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    723

    Post Bye bye, bile? Websites try to nix nasty comments

    This article in the Boston Globe: Bye bye, bile? Websites try to nix nasty comments brought back thoughts of the discussions here on this forum on this topic. The Crier has implemented real name commenting (and seen the volume of comments go down dramatically), while the Patch continues use of anonymous commenting, and has seen the quality of comments go down dramatically.

    I welcome your thoughts on the topic, subject, of course, to your using your real name.
    Last edited by Kim Reichelt; 12-27-2013 at 03:19 PM. Reason: to update the URL (as noted in post below)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Wayland MA
    Posts
    1,431

    Default

    1. Page 1 of the boston.com* article is here.
    2. Here's a DF post about the Town Crier's new commenting system.
    3. Here's an earlier DF post about the DF's policy requiring identification.
    4. A DF post about an NPR article on this topic.

    *With all due respect (and a lot of respect is due), the article is on boston.com, not in the Boston Globe. Had I been posting anonymously, who knows how nastily I might have made this correction. [grin]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    723

    Default

    Thanks for the other links, Jeff.

    I updated my link to reflect your point 1 (no reason to leave the wrong link in there for any historical purposes)

    As for your other correction about boston.com (v. Boston Globe), fair (and true) enough. And I am glad you kept it civil with your name attached! :-)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Wayland MA
    Posts
    1,431

    Default

    I'm not normally a fan of Jeff Jacoby (can't the Boston Globe find a thoughtful token conservative?), but to his point #4, I'm all in agreement.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Jacoby
    4. Detoxify the comment sections. Why do media outlets tolerate the pollution of their websites with poisonous comments from anonymous posters? Feedback from readers is a fine thing, and a rollicking comment section can greatly enrich the experience of following the news. But editors enforce standards of taste and tone when they publish letters to the editor. They should be similarly concerned about the taste and tone of the comment forums they provide. As public discourse grows ever more bitter, here, at least, is one way that news sites can refuse to enable the ugliness.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    723

    Default

    The Boston Globe published another piece on comment sections I thought worth sharing:
    Sick of comment sections? Say no more.

    Allowing anonymous commenting is definitely "good for business", if by that you mean lots of people re-loading the same article over and over again to add unedited drivel into a conversation. There are no almost no comments at the Crier after a prior life as a hotbed of anonymous and truly vile commenting. The recently added anonymous comments section at Wayland Transparency is a great example of what you get with anonymous commenting - lots of unsubstantiated "facts" and innuendo interwoven with some constructive and thoughtful comments.

    There's no perfect answer here. It would be great if people felt comfortable having open and honest discussion. When a more private venue is necessary and anonymous posting is allowed, it would be nice if people would remain as civil and thoughtful as if their name was being broadcast. Unfortunately, both ends of this spectrum prove difficult and challenging.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    723

    Default

    I just noticed that the Globe article that inspired this thread in the first place is no longer online.

    It was actually an Associated Press piece and it can still be found online here: http://jacksonville.com/breaking-new...nasty-comments

    Other pieces worth a read:
    “Why We’re Shutting Off Our Comments,” Suzanne LaBarre, PopularScience.com, September 24, 2013, read online.
    “This Story Stinks,” Dominique Brossard and Dietram A. Scheufele, The New York Times, March 2, 2013, read online.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •