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  1. #1
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    Smile Selectmen's Forum On How We Define Ourselves

    I gather from your notice regarding Wednesday night's gathering that the Selectmen are trying to identify how to define the essence of Wayland. As Wayland is assuming the status of the community paying the state's highest property taxes, and as that is rapidly becoming our most recognized attribute, particularly to the real estate market, perhaps one of the following could serve as our new town slogan:

    Wayland: #1 in Taxachusetts
    Wayland: The Buck Stops Here!
    Wayland: Flood Zone for Deep Pockets
    Wayland: Our Favorite Money Pit!
    Wayland: If You Lived Here, You'd Be Broke By Now
    Wayland: On the Fast Track to the Poor House

    or my favorite:

    Wayland: Poverty Loves Company


    Maybe my fellow readers of Wayland eNews could add to the list in assistance of our Selectmen.


    Steven M. Glovsky
    Shaw Drive

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steven M. Glovsky View Post
    As Wayland is assuming the status of the community paying the state's highest property taxes, and as that is rapidly becoming our most recognized attribute, ...
    With all due respect, Mr. Glovsky might consider doing a bit of research before so cavalierly tossing around inflammatory statements such as the one above. Since 1989 (which is as far back as the MA Department of Revenue reports data), Wayland's rank in average tax bill has been as follows: 10, 8, 6, 5, 6, 6, 6, 6, 5, 5, 5, 5, 7, 7, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 7, 7, 7, 6. Note that the most recent rank (2010) was $43 above Concord in 7th. That trend hardly reflects a change in "status."

    We can't look at expenses in a vacuum, of course. Wayland ranks 7th in per capita income and median household income (US Census). Roughly speaking, Wayland spends in line with its means. I'm in no way minimizing the economic difficulties faced by Wayland residents, which are no different than those in the rest of the Commonwealth and across the nation. As we address this and other problems, however, it's important to do so with the facts.

  3. #3
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    Default Hiding From Reality As Usual

    It has been widely reported in the press that Wayland will be rising to the rank of highest tax paying community this year as our tax bills begin to reflect the cost of the new High School. Search "Wayland property taxes" and you'll see Wayland's taxes branded out-of-line with our neighbors by folks who decided not to purchase a new home here because of our taxes. It is longtime past when we should be misled by statements such as those of Mr. Dieffenbach into going along with a situation that is hurting us all. A few years back, just before this current financial crisis, Mr. Dieffenbach and the School Committee insisted that cutting the school budget in other places by 5% to save Loker School would force the elimination of art and music programs in all our schools. When the financial crisis hit, larger budget cuts were made without any such impact on our school programs. Closing Loker as a neighborhood elementary school was and remains a serious mistake to the quality of Wayland life and its attractiveness to families - parents choose a town for their babies not their high schoolers . The citizens of Wayland, now more than ever, need to move past Mr. Dieffenbach's continued efforts to cover over a circumstance of real concern for the long-term welfare of our community. IT'S NO JOKE!
    Last edited by Steven M. Glovsky; 09-28-2010 at 09:11 AM.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steven M. Glovsky View Post
    It has been widely reported in the press that Wayland will be rising to the rank of highest tax paying community this year as our tax bills begin to reflect the cost of the new High School.
    That can't possibly be. Wayland's average tax bill for 2010 was $10,982. I don't recall the exact number, but my recollection is that at its peak, the high school will add on the order of $500 to the average tax bill. That would move Wayland from 6th to 5th, and certainly not close to Sherborn's $12,626 (2nd) or Weston's $15,542 (1st).

    Quote Originally Posted by Steven M. Glovsky View Post
    It is longtime past when we should be misled by statements such as those of Mr. Diefenbach into going along with a situation that is hurting us all. A few years back, just before this current financial crisis, Mr. Diefenbach and the School Committee insisted that cutting the school budget in other places by 5% to save Loker School would force the elimination of art and music programs in all our schools. When the financial crisis hit, larger budget cuts were made without any such impact on our school programs.
    When were school budget cuts larger than 5%? The largest budget reduction that I'm aware of was the 1.7% decrease in FY11 vs. FY10, and that was in part enrollment driven.

    Quote Originally Posted by Steven M. Glovsky View Post
    Closing Loker as a neighborhood elementary school was and remains a serious mistake to the quality of Wayland life and its attractiveness to families - parents choose a town for their babies not their high schoolers . The citizens of Wayland, now more than ever, need to move past Mr. Diefenbach's continued efforts to cover over a circumstance of real concern for the long-term welfare of our community. IT'S NO JOKE!
    I'm not sure what "circumstance" I'm "covering over." Are you suggesting that the data that I cited are in error?

  5. #5
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    Default Blinded To Reality

    Ask a real estate broker about the impact of Wayland's real estate taxes on the marketability of Wayland properties. Read the next newspaper article in the paper reporting on Wayland properties' poor sales performance compared to our neighbors in this market. Can everyone else's analysis of Wayland's situation be wrong? Reality bites Mr. Dieffenbach!

















    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Dieffenbach View Post
    That can't possibly be. Wayland's average tax bill for 2010 was $10,982. I don't recall the exact number, but my recollection is that at its peak, the high school will add on the order of $500 to the average tax bill. That would move Wayland from 6th to 5th, and certainly not close to Sherborn's $12,626 (2nd) or Weston's $15,542 (1st).



    When were school budget cuts larger than 5%? The largest budget reduction that I'm aware of was the 1.7% decrease in FY11 vs. FY10, and that was in part enrollment driven.



    I'm not sure what "circumstance" I'm "covering over." Are you suggesting that the data that I cited are in error?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steven M. Glovsky View Post
    Ask a real estate broker about the impact of Wayland's real estate taxes on the marketability of Wayland properties. Read the next newspaper article in the paper reporting on Wayland properties' poor sales performance compared to our neighbors in this market. Can everyone else's analysis of Wayland's situation be wrong? Reality bites Mr. Dieffenbach!
    I'm not disputing that the Wayland real estate market is tight. My point continues to be that hyperbolic statements unsupported by the facts don't help the conversation. Wayland's income and average tax bill rank against other Commonwealth towns remain where they have been for more than two decades, your assertion to the contrary notwithstanding.
    Last edited by Jeff Dieffenbach; 09-28-2010 at 09:11 AM. Reason: Corrected typos.

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