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Thread: 40th Anniversary of Moon Landing

  1. #16
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    Default

    John, this is a thread that I started to talk about the 40th anniversary of the moon landing. If you want to indulge in your usual all-about-Loker-all-the-time theme, why don't you start your own thread instead of hijacking this one?

  2. #17
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    Default Back on topic

    Sorry, Steve. You’re right.

    When Jeff goes off on a tangent like that, in this case talking about spin, I just can’t help but follow, in order to clean up after him and/or correct him. I had thought about starting a new thread, perhaps called “Is Jeff Dieffenbach Fit to be on our School Committee?” (if you read my posts, you’ll see that my mantra really isn’t all about Loker at all, but all about the SC), but I just got lazy and posted here.

    To bring this back to your original post, I was one of those who was glued to the telly 40 years ago today. It was a truly momentous occasion that I’ll never forget. Even today, seeing that footage is no less thrilling than it was on that day. I was somewhat of a space junkie, saving all of the newspapers and Life magazines of the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo launches.

    Oh, and as to Armstrong’s first words upon setting foot on the moon, just prior to his botched first sentence with the missing “a”, was an unplanned, one syllable “Wow!” I forgot that, but heard him refer to it on NPR the other day.

    .
    John Flaherty

    Any views expressed are NOT mine alone.
    Wayland Transparency - Facts Without Spin
    http://www.waylandtransparency.com/

  3. #18
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by John Flaherty View Post
    Sorry, Steve. You’re right.

    When Jeff goes off on a tangent like that, in this case talking about spin, I just can’t help but follow, in order to clean up after him and/or correct him.
    John, do you really believe what you write? I didn't "go off on a tangent," I interjected a five word bit of levity poking fun at you for always accusing me of spin.

    "Clean up after him and/or correct him?" As if you're some arbiter of truth? Please. You've got your biases just like we all do. You spin (or position, or explain, or whatever) just like we all do. To say anything different is for you to falsely place yourself on a pedestal you haven't earned and won't.

  4. #19
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    Default Spintronaut

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Dieffenbach View Post
    I interjected a five word bit of levity poking fun at you for always accusing me of spin.
    Jeff, I still think you should work for NASA.

  5. #20
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AlanJReiss View Post
    Jeff, I still think you should work for NASA.
    Since this is the second time you've written that, I'm going to assume that you mean it more seriously than I took it the first time. And, I think my thoughts are clearly within the spirit of what Steve had in mind when he started this thread.

    I think that NASA *could* be a phenomenal place to work. The question is, *would* it be such a place? According to their web site, "NASA's mission is to pioneer the future in space exploration, scientific discovery and aeronautics research."

    I could be on board with that (pun not intended). The question is, will they have the freedom to pursue that mission? One could argue that we shouldn't be spending precious funds on an endeavor whose benefits are so unknown, but I buy into the idea that it's important to continually invest in the future (401k plans, teacher professional development, etc.) even when it means an added tightening of the belt with respect to the day-to-day.

    As a side note, I just finished listening to an audio recording of "Perfectly Reasonable Deviations From the Beaten Track," a collection of letters to and from the great Richard Feynman. The book touches lightly on his work with NASA following the Challenger explosion, reminding me of the memorable role that he played in that investigation. I wonder if the NASA of today and tomorrow will be one that Feynman would have lauded?

    I'd like to see NASA push hard for a manned mission to Mars, with colonization the next major space goal. Kim Stanley Robinson, in his outstanding Red Mars/Green Mars/Blue Mars trilogy, outlines one possible direction this might take.

    I'd love to see where Robinson was right and wrong, and go along for the ride.

  6. #21
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    Default Trying to keep it lite....

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Dieffenbach View Post
    Since this is the second time you've written that, I'm going to assume that you mean it more seriously than I took it the first time. And, I think my thoughts are clearly within the spirit of what Steve had in mind when he started this thread.
    Everybody spins, you me ... everybody. Some do it better than others. I've always told you that you had a talent for it and, in fact, after getting into politics, it intrigued me to understand how to hone those skills.

    I think we both saw the movie "Thank you for smoking" and we had a discussion about it. That movie was spinology 101. I highly recommend seeing it right after 'Ferris Bueller's Day off'.

    You did see the title of my last post as being 'Spintronaut'... so I'm trying to keep things lite here but also keeping in line with the sense of the thread.

    OK, you shouldn't work for NASA... I should work for NASA.
    in fact, I'd volunteer to go to Mars but I couldn't keep my space cookies down.

  7. #22
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Dieffenbach View Post
    I'd like to see NASA push hard for a manned mission to Mars, with colonization the next major space goal.
    Here's a countervailing opinion on salon.com from Joseph Romm, a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress. He makes the reasonable point that we need to be sure that we aren't destroying our current world before exploring for new ones.

    I agree--we don't need to solve all earthly problems before exploring space, but having the sustainability of earth in hand seems like a pretty worthy pre-condition.

  8. #23
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    Default Eureka

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Dieffenbach View Post
    I agree--we don't need to solve all earthly problems before exploring space, but having the sustainability of earth in hand seems like a pretty worthy pre-condition.
    The 'Eureka' phenomenon is the most exciting part of doing something hard like going to Mars on a manned mission. Many things will be learned, developed and applied in the process of trying to do it. Things which cannot be predicted but I'm sure will be encountered.

    The desire to explore and push out to new areas are the things which make us human. So I don't see doing this stuff as an either-or to solving earthly problems because the two may be part of the same solution.

  9. #24
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    Default Recent pictures now available from LRO on Tranquility Base

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Perlman View Post
    Monday, July 20, will be the 40th anniversary of the day that Neil Armstrong became the first human to set foot on the moon.
    See for yourself...

    http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/ba...imaged-by-lro/

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