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Thread: A year of major losses

  1. #1
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    Default A year of major losses

    The list of high profile deaths this year is incredible and in such a short period of time. Death has also touched close to home this year for me with my father's passing at 89 - just weeks ago.

    Perhaps it has for you too.

    With Farah Fawcett, Michael Jackson, Robert McNamara and tonight ... I read that Walter Cronkite is dead at 92. He was in the same class as Edward R. Murrow. Cronkite's career goes back to WWII and was seen as the most 'trusted man in America'. He dies just days short of the 40th anniversary of the first Moon Landing of which he was closely associated.

    What an incredible year of losses. Your thoughts?
    Or perhaps death is something we just don't talk about.

  2. #2
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    For what it's worth, I'd ascribe "major loss" to those who made the planet a better place. Please drop Michael Jackson from your list.

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    Default Please Reconsider MJ

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Dieffenbach View Post
    For what it's worth, I'd ascribe "major loss" to those who made the planet a better place. Please drop Michael Jackson from your list.
    Although your reaction to MJ is not unlike the reaction of many others and, including myself. I was not able to continue to listen to and enjoy his music after 1993 and, in my mind, I put his massive talent on the back burner but always kept the fond memories of his music somewhere tucked away.

    After his passing, whatever negative reactions I had about the allegations dissolved and I was able to listen to Off the Wall, Thriller and Dangerous and purchased all three CD's 2 days after the funeral. Perhaps that was odd on my part but in his death, the objections and suspicions washed away and I could just enjoy his amazing music once again.

    The size of the outpouring of love, respect and grief across all continents is prima facia evidence that he made the Earth a better planet. This cannot be denied and therefore, I cannot drop that name from my list.

    Respectfully....

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    Default

    I guess we'll have to agree to disagree, then. I certainly can't assign any value to the outpouring--heck, millions of people probably love the Yankees.

    No problems with loving MJ's music (I never particularly got into it--ditto, BTW, for the Beatles), but separate the art from the man. Same with Cat Stevens' music (which I *do* love)--separate it from the wreck of a "man" that is Yusuf Islam.

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    Talking Not the Beatles?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Dieffenbach View Post
    (I never particularly got into it--ditto, BTW, for the Beatles)
    NOT THE BEATLES?
    See this....

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eQUapVeyweA
    (I had to change the youtube since it was taken down due to copyright so see it now.... Band on the Run)

    What? Are you from a different planet? Jeff....
    Last edited by AlanJReiss; 07-18-2009 at 02:18 PM.

  6. #6
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    Pretending to like the Beatles is like pretending to be religious--an insult to those who have faith. Give me Jimmy Buffett, Meatloaf, Barenaked Ladies, Jack Johnson, and Jenny Lewis, and I'm in heaven. The Fab Four simply never rang my bell.

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    Default This Just In – Hell Freezes Over

    I agree with Jeff D about Michael Jackson not being of the caliber to warrant a “major loss”, at least not to me. However, while his style never did anything for me, I still have a lot of respect for his well earned place in entertainment and musical history, even if he was a mess in his personal life.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Dieffenbach View Post
    I never particularly got into it--ditto, BTW, for the Beatles
    This explains a lot....

    .
    John Flaherty

    Any views expressed are NOT mine alone.
    Wayland Transparency - Facts Without Spin
    http://www.waylandtransparency.com/

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    Default

    Leave it to a bunch of guys... so Farah Fawcett is a major loss?


    I've never quite understood why being well-known meant you were important. Doing important things makes you important. Maybe entertaining people is important, but Charlie's Angels doesn't cut it for me.

    Here's an interesting list: http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/200...IDE_index.html, though I have to admit it includes Farah.

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    Default Farah Fawcett

    Quote Originally Posted by Kim Reichelt View Post
    Leave it to a bunch of guys... so Farah Fawcett is a major loss?
    Its really not a sexist thing at all to me... its much more personal.

    Farah was first, a pinup girl who defined beauty and youth for a generation. If one is part of that generation and sees somebody like her getting old and/or dying then one realizes (even more) their own mortality.

    So my original thread had, between the lines, the concept that well known figures from my generation (and before) were dying and at this time they were dying at high density over such a short period of time.

    In fairness to Farah she evolved to be more than where she started with made for TV movies that spotlighted abuse against women and she was also involved in charities. From what I've read she, despite here 'Helen of Troy' good looks, had a solid character, she was kind and she had the guts to show her fight against cancer through her documentary. The documentary didn't show her as a beauty queen rather, but as a middle aged lady on chemotherapy after enduring painful surgeries and showed the world her tears an her fears that she wasn't going to make it.

    So again, Farah started out as a pinup girl (as a birth gift) and but ended up as a women who rallied for good causes and presented herself as a role model for the generation after her. I have the greatest respect for Farah Fawcett and to me, given all of these things... its a major loss.

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    Default

    OK, Alan, that was well-put and totally fair.

    For me, perhaps, that was Christopher Reeve, who as Superman, defined strength and youth and invincibility. All of which, we know, can be lost in a moment (well, maybe not so much youth, but...) His death, after years of a dignified fight, was a major loss.

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    Default Almost the same... yes

    Quote Originally Posted by Kim Reichelt View Post
    For me, perhaps, that was Christopher Reeve, who as Superman, defined strength and youth and invincibility. All of which, we know, can be lost in a moment (well, maybe not so much youth, but...) His death, after years of a dignified fight, was a major loss.
    I can definitely see the parallels here. If he would have passed just this recent season, it would have made the list even more ominous.

    Christopher Reeve, like Michael J Fox has helped to shine the light on stem-cell research and now that Bush is gone... well its happening at an accelerated rate.

    In a sense Chris Reeve started out as a pinup and ended up much more just like Farah.

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