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Thread: Our School "Reconfiguration"

  1. #1
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    Default Our School "Reconfiguration"

    Recapping the first week of our elementary school reconfiguration:
    • We have overcrowded classes in two very packed elementary schools
    • Long, crowded bus rides that consume fuel that is more than 2x the cost it was last year. How long? One Kindergarten run was 90 minutes last week! How crowded? Kids have been spotted sitting on the bus floor in at least one instance!
    • An incredible environmental impact of cars driving extra routes all over town and idling in front of schools due to poor bus planning
    • Teachers who have lost previously allotted prep time at the 1-5 level because they must now attend to hundreds of students waiting for late busses and kids whose days have increased by up to two hours due to longer commutes to school and the late bus pickups
    • Less than 10-minute lunches for the kids at Happy Hollow who, in many documented cases, are forced to eat part of their lunch at snack or on the bus ride home because they can't eat it all at lunchtime. One student went through the line, bought lunch, and when she sat down, was told her time was up. No lunch that day for her.
    • Bus stops on main roads that have, in many documented cases again, endangered kids waiting at these unsafe areas (West Plain and Parkland, as an example)
    • Highly questionable net savings -- the entire Loker building, for example, is still being used by the town with no outside rental income or utility savings as discussed

    All this, and the bonus of an administration who simply cannot get out of their own way to communicate with parents in an efficient (what about using listserves to e-mail worried parents about late busses, for example?) or entirely truthful (i.e. - "minor bussing issues" as Gary Burton noted in his one communication to parents last week) manner. What a shame!!

    Do you agree? Do you think this is all fine? If you're upset, come to next week's School Committee meeting on 9/15 and share your thoughts.

  2. #2
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    Default My observations: "reconfiguration"

    I agree with Mr. Baron. Thankfully, my daughter can walk or bike to HH with only one street to cross. The two times I have gone to pick drop her off or pick her up, I have observed chaos, and long wait times for kids who are bussed. Schools ends at 2:45, and the busses weren't called until 3:15: that's 30 minutes for the teacher to contain the kids past the end of school. There are 25 kids in the class, with no aide. Plus, there is literally no where to park. With 4 busses at HH now, where are there any savings!

    As a fourteen year resident, when my oldest was a HH, there was one bus, and more kids, and a smoother system.

    I dropped off a friend's kid at Loker, and I bet that kindergarden doesn't get underway until at least 9am. Cars were parked all over the grass, and people were streaming in at 8:45. Plus, an orange cone is partially blocking the drive! Full day kindergarten must be a priority for Wayland, if this configuration stands.

    I say that we must demand that Dr. Burton gave a full accounting of the "savings" and hold a public meeting to address these types of issues.

  3. #3
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    We will, of course, remember that we did this because of the drop in student enrollment in our elementary schools. Well, Jeff D. said it was to pass the override. I believe him.

    According to the latest figures from the school department, there is a grand total of (drum roll, please) 11 (yes, that's right, eleven) fewer students across the entire K-5 spectrum in Wayland as compared to last year (1213 vs. 1202 -- a reduction of 0.9&#37.

    Was it worth it to jam this "reconfiguration" home with no real analysis or preparation? Well, we got the override passed. But at the cost of the situation we now find ourselves in. All for eleven fewer kids. I'd love to hear someone defend this!
    Last edited by Jeff Baron; 09-11-2008 at 08:10 AM. Reason: Misplaced decimal point...sorry :)

  4. #4
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    Default

    Jeff, I'm not going to argue that the schools aren't too crowded (they are). But 11/1213 is 0.9%

  5. #5
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    Default

    You know, I had been thinking about this on the way to work and had realized my decimal point was misplaced. You just beat me to it. I stand corrected on that point. Glad to know that's all we disagreed on

  6. #6
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    Nothing else to argue about on that post.

    I am hopeful that the just announced shift in the school day will help restore the bus rides to more normal durations.

    I would love to hear from someone who has a child at Loker on how things are going there, and to hear more about the lunch situation at Happy Hollow. It is hard to tell among the anecdotes being shared how much of the griping is ongoing issues that many people share, and how much is something that happened one time to one person (though I'm not intending to trivialize such events).

    My perspective on Claypit at this point is that the building is too crowded, but that the school days are running generally fine.

    General miscellaneous thoughts:

    • The administration and teachers at the school are doing a remarkable job of maintaining some semblance of order, and keeping things reasonably well-organized. I don't understand the rationale for some of the end-of-day dismissal changes, but I am confident that they are thought out, and things seem to be working.
    • The pickup lines are too long. Hopefully, this will improve when the busing situation improves, as perhaps more parents will let their kids ride the buses. BUT... if the "no playdates on buses" policy continues, MANY parents will need to drive to enable playdates. I hope that policy can be relaxed (particularly if many parents continue to drive their kids home - that policy is exascerbating the pickup problem).
    • Having library take place IN the library (not in a separate classroom) is awkward, particularly for the classrooms that surround the library (this said as a library volunteer who is wondering how she will reshelve books while the librarian is working with the children in the same space).
    • I have heard no complaints, at least from my kids, about lunch (other than food quality :-)
    • Other than the first day, when road construction substantially worsened the bus situation, at least my kids have not been particularly bothered by any of the changes, and have been excited to have some of their "Loker friends" at the school. (It should be noted, however, that we have the major advantage of being the first bus stop on the way home, and the last stop on the way to school, so long bus rides have not been an issue)

  7. #7
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    Default Child at Loker..................

    Since you asked................ Loker has a fair amount of problems due to what seems to be a lack of adequate policies and procedures put into place. There is no adminsitration person or Nurse on duty in the afternoon, thus people are pretty much free to enter and leave the building as they desire. I just heard a story about a child that was picked up inside the building without coming into contact with any adult! Which means a child in the hallway is not safe. Another child needed medical attention and no proper procedures were followed. There are several students with Asthma in "Base" that require an epipen be at the site. To date, there is no nurse and no properly trained personel to administer. Yesterday, a child was told he could not eat his lunch because he brought PB&J! No lunch for a six year old, due to lack of training an inadequate policies and procedures! Promised bus service has yet to be provided. OK, if you are not going to provide then advise me as such. As of 9/11, I am told it will be provided. One hour fifteen minute bus ride to school. The only thing making the ride shorter is that more parents are now driving kids! I feel sorry for the teachers, who are as always, doing a wonderful job and put into a bad situation. There are many other issues with "Base" which I do not wish to discuss on this forum. I commend Dr. Burton (I would not want his job) for acknowledging that mistakes have been made. I hope to be able to similarly commend him for fixing all of the mistakes, not just the ones referenced in his post. We have problems, but everyone of them can be fixed if the administration and SC are willing to do so without being defensive. Agree or disagree with reconfiguration, the cost has been divided community, upset parents, anxious children and mistrust of our leaders. This without likely measurable savings on the budget side! It is time for the SC and Administration to stop talking and start listening; so that we as a community may achieve the stated goals of the mission. Sorry, but you asked............
    Last edited by Mike Schreiber; 09-11-2008 at 02:45 PM. Reason: typo

  8. #8
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    Default Transportation Update!

    I have just been informed by the administration that they have changed the transportation schedule for certain Kindergarten children. The change will reduce our child's ride from one hour and 15 minutes to something must shorter. Joy also informed me that they are in the process of contracting "Base" transportaion. On this issue, Dr. Burton is living up to his word and I aprreciate it and need to acknowledge that.
    Last edited by Mike Schreiber; 09-11-2008 at 02:36 PM. Reason: correction

  9. #9
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    Default More Transportation Screw-Ups

    I read Gary Burton's notice pretty carefully and it states, without much of a doubt, that morning bus schedules will be adjusted by fifteen minutes. In fact, to quote exactly, he said "however, all pick-up and drop-off times for children riding individual buses should now be adjusted by 15 minutes. Therefore, if your child was picked up at 7:45 a.m., he/she should expect the same bus and driver to pick him/her up 15 minutes later at 8:00. Or, if a child was dropped off at an afternoon bus stop at 3:15, he or she will now be dropped off at 3:30." I even confirmed this in a call to his office because the second part of the above quote seems to say that kids will be getting home fifteen minutes later than they do now, which is not true (in actuality, they should get home at about the same time as they do now).

    This morning, we asked the bus driver if she would, indeed, be arriving fifteen minutes later and she said "no, they told me to come five minutes later."

    It is bad enough that the current problems with busses exist. Now, had we not thought to ask the bus driver, the confusion would cause us to miss the bus altogether on Monday and get stuck in the traffic up at Claypit.

    What is right? What is wrong? Why can't we get this right? Why can't there be effective, clear and correct communication with the school community?

  10. #10
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    Smile My observations, for what they're worth

    Obviously transportation still has bugs - with luck and a prayer things will smooth out next week.

    We walk to Happy Hollow have vowed to not to drive since we live so close .(I can hear the kids screaming in our backyard during their recess - I think they're having fun - but boy - do they SCREAM - it certainly drowns out mine) I have seen many cars belonging to parents bombing into the HH driveway. Everybody has to SLOW DOWN. It's not the end of the world to get a late pass. Or even better leave for school earlier. A speed limit of 5 miles per hour sounds reasonable to me in the school driveway. Also people consider parking on Juniper Lane at the top of the hill on Pequot if you don't have appointments after school. Get out and hang out in the lobby or under a tree and get to know some of the parents. It's also a great way to get some cardio going back up the hill. My advice in a nutshell to parents driving kids to HH: Leave earlier in the morning for drop-off; park on Juniper at the top of the hill off Pequot; and drive much more cautiously.

  11. #11
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    Just a quick update on my post this morning, which was e-mailed to Gary Burton for a response just before it was posted here. What he had to say wasn't really helpful in understanding the bus situation. That is because he did not respond to the e-mail at all. I guess ten-minute swings in bus pick-up times in a situation where busses have been a huge problem and more parental confusion weren't important enough to warrant a response. There was a brief mention of the potential for confusion in an update to K (Loker) parents who were told to show up at bus stops the same time as this week as the busses may show up earlier than expected. However, nothing that I have seen to the 1-5 community and certainly no direct response to my query.

    For information given the events of the past two weeks, I post the following sumary of Gary Burton's evaluation (as sumarized by WVN). I wonder how good the SC is feeling about his and his office's (specifically Joy Buehler) performance over the past two weeks. I'm sure we won't hear, but I'd really like to know this time.

    "On Aug. 25 the School Committee finished its annual evaluation of Superintendent Gary Burton. Burton has been criticized in the last year by members of the community for his role in the school reconfiguration,financial management, short-changing of technology in the schools, staff violation of election laws, and other matters, but none of that appears to be reflected in his evaluation.

    As in the past, longest-serving School Committee member Jeff Dieffenbach objected to any hint of criticism of the superintendent.

    He objected to a sentence in one of the evaluation drafts reading "For significant decisions on the order of magnitude of the elementary school reconfiguration, some members of the Committee would appreciate more guidance from Dr. Burton regarding the appropriate process to follow in making such decisions. "

    Chairman Louis Jurist immediately supported Dieffenbach's objection. Members Heather Pineault and Deb Cohen said they felt pressured by Burton to decide prematurely which school should be closed. But member Barbara Fletcher added her vote to delete the comment."

  12. #12
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    Default my observation of reconfiguration

    I wanted to share my thoughts about the first couple weeks of school. With 3 kids in 3 different schools (Loker, Happy Hollow, and Middle School) I am very close to the reconfigured situation. I have also been working throughout the summer on the HH/Loker PTO Board to ensure Loker is enriched by the PTO and communication is both applicable and appropriate for the Kindy population. In doing this, I have had the opportunity to coordinate and/or participate in such processes as riding the Kindergarten noon buses, observing lunch at HH, Lice checks, PTO meetings such as Kindy welcome coffee, both screening days, HH new parent coffee and many, many other situations.

    In every encounter, I have been astounded by the flexibility, professionalism, quick response to inquiries/concerns, and accommodations made by all staff to ensure the safety and learning of my children.

    I have heard many complaints that the reconfiguration is "not working" and searched further to understand for myself. What I discovered is that the process is not necessarily not broken, it just needs more time for the learning curve, change in culture, and tweaking. Some examples:

    "my 2nd grader is only getting 10 minutes for lunch and then getting kicked out before they ate"
    In my observation of 2nd grade lunch and from my conversation with the lunch monitor, I have realized that Loker students are not used to staggered lunches. That is, the entry of the next grade, at Loker, signified time to go, whereas HH has a rolling/staggered schedule where some enter and join others who still have time. Also, Loker kids are not used to lunch before recess. Therefore, they need time to realize that eating must occur first or they will be hungry later. They will quickly learn, as did HH kids, that skipping eating a full meal to rush outside, will cause them problems later in the day. They also did not realize that you can skip the line when only purchasing milk. I observed a very orderly, full (but not overcrowded) lunchroom where monitors were reminding kids to eat and fully in charge of who is finished and who should stay. A child was reminded of timeframes (warned that time was running out) because this child had sat socializing with lunchbox closed for quite some time. Certainly they might go home and say that they only had 10minutes for lunch!

    "the kindergarten bus took 1 1/2 hours!"
    Depends when you start the clock. Some days teachers brought kids out to buses at 11:50 in order to start the loading process (each child checked off prior to getting on all 4 buses). A bus may then leave at 12:20. There were many stops where parents were not there yet b/c the time had been later the days prior. This causes delays while the driver and dispatcher try to reach the parent. Much training is needed for the kids who are new to bussing. They are slow to exit, need help/reminder to take belongings and are very distracted at this new experience. After the route, the bus returned to Loker to drop the volunteer monitor. You can paint the picture as a 45 minute bus ride or 1 1/2 hours, depending on how you count. Yes, they are long, but I'd rather my daughter have a long busride and great teachers/programs. This too, will only get better each day as the kids and drivers become more familiar and Admin. adjusts routes and times.

    "the drop-off/pickup at HH is disorganized and unsafe"
    HH certainly could've done a better job explaining details such as outdoor recess at drop-off, IN/OUT recess signs, etc., no pickup until reaching the dumpster, etc. It's strange how you don't realize that it is done any other way and that other Waylanders just "know" these things--our bad--we did alot of orienting, but seem to have forgotten some points that would've been very helpful to know ahead of time. Many of the comments heard at our new parent PTO mtg were things about not realizing you could park at the top of the hill and walk down to avoid getting stuck in dismissal tie ups. Also, it was unclear that when people go through the "live" lane they are not always cutting, but may be parking to go in (and yes, some cut and need to be told not to). People also didn't realize that your child shouldn't walk beyond the dumpster (now changed to the caf. door) to your car in line. At Loker I learned that there is a white line painted as a guide to kids and parents of how far they can go on the curb (great idea btw and maybe HH should do the same?). My point is, every year there are new parents who come to learn these "tricks of the trade" as the year progresses...sometimes takes a couple of years to truly understand how best to navigate pickup! What I see at HH and Loker, everyday, is caring staff doing their best to be flexible and patient during the learning curve and process adjustments (and readjustments!). It will def. take some time for all to understand the process and align with new ways of doing things. In the meantime, I have not seen children unsafe and certainly would not bring my child to any school if I felt it was not safe.

    I am thankful for Administrations tireless efforts and flexibility--I hear them saying they made mistakes on bus routes/start/end times. Changing back the school hours occurred quickly and reasonably and says to me, that Admin. is responsive and accountable. I am not inferring that this has not been difficult or without problems, but please understand that people are quick to say the elementary schools aren't working well, when really the most important piece, our amazing teachers, are working wonders. I respect the people who searched their souls to make decisions which have saved our wonderful teachers and great programs and class sizes (yes, there were more sections above recommended guidelines last year than this year! Another interesting point I recently found out was that we probably avoided adding a Kindy teacher by consolidating them all together and "topping off" each class). These buildings have seen higher numbers and being close to, at, or one above the max of Wayland's class size guidelines, does not mean we are OVERcrowded.

    Please know....I am totally aware of the the inconveniences and culture challenges faced by so many (some way more than others), I am simply saying that these will improve every day and so much has gone right, inside the classrooms, in this short time.

    Thanks for taking the time to read this lengthy entry which is completely my opinion based on my own observations and experiences--it is neither right nor wrong!!!

  13. #13
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    Absolutely Astounding!
    John Flaherty

    Any views expressed are NOT mine alone.
    Wayland Transparency - Facts Without Spin
    http://www.waylandtransparency.com/

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Baron View Post
    For information given the events of the past two weeks, I post the following sumary [sic] of Gary Burton's evaluation (as sumarized [sic] by WVN). I wonder how good the SC is feeling about his and his office's (specifically Joy Buehler [sic]) performance over the past two weeks. I'm sure we won't hear, but I'd really like to know this time.

    "On Aug. 25 the School Committee finished its annual evaluation of Superintendent Gary Burton. Burton has been criticized in the last year by members of the community for his role in the school reconfiguration,financial [sic] management, short-changing of technology in the schools, staff violation of election laws, and other matters, but none of that appears to be reflected in his evaluation.

    As in the past, longest-serving School Committee member Jeff Dieffenbach objected to any hint of criticism of the superintendent.

    He objected to a sentence in one of the evaluation drafts reading "For significant decisions on the order of magnitude of the elementary school reconfiguration, some members of the Committee would appreciate more guidance from Dr. Burton regarding the appropriate process to follow in making such decisions. "

    Chairman Louis Jurist immediately supported Dieffenbach's objection. Members Heather Pineault and Deb Cohen said they felt pressured by Burton to decide prematurely which school should be closed. But member Barbara Fletcher added her vote to delete the comment."
    With WVN, of course, you need to consider the source (cue John Flaherty response to the effect that the same is true of me). I do not object to any hint of criticism (or actual criticism itself), just those that are unfair. In the case of the elementary school configuration, WVN saw fit not to report the context of my objection: namely, that I saw no reason to saddle Dr. Burton with criticism that in this case should have been directed at me (recall that Dr. Burton recommended against the reconfiguration for FY09).

    As for the general subject of the superintendent evaluation, I find it to be broken. As Dr. Burton will attest, when I have (infrequent) constructive criticism of his work, I share it with him directly and immediately rather than waiting for an arbitrary once a year (and flawed) event.

    Any short-changing of technology has been that of the School Committee, not the Superintendent, and, of course, not in a vacuum, but rather in the context of competing budget needs. The Superintendent's Technology Task Force, supported by the Committee, is a strong step forward.

    The Superintendent's response to the election law violation alluded to by WVN was appropriate; they are correct that we should have added this commendation to his evaluation. Perhaps WVN faults Dr. Burton for not hovering over the shoulder of each of his 200+ employees monitoring their every keystroke.

    "Other matters" sounds as if there's some long litany of offenses, but absent any listing of them, it's a weak charge that falls flat.

    And as for the subject of transportation, there is no doubt that it has not been smooth. I certainly don't blame Dr. Burton or Ms. Buhler for that, and I laud their efforts to repair the situation thrust on them by the School Committee.

    I regret the discomfort that this situation has caused but would like to remind Wayland residents of the overarching reason for it--getting last April's override passed. We can argue until the end of time whether it would have been approved without the reconfiguration, but to no avail.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by TracyScheidemantel View Post
    I have heard many complaints that the reconfiguration is "not working" and searched further to understand for myself. What I discovered is that the process is not necessarily not broken, it just needs more time for the learning curve, change in culture, and tweaking. Some examples:

    "my 2nd grader is only getting 10 minutes for lunch and then getting kicked out before they ate"
    In my observation of 2nd grade lunch and from my conversation with the lunch monitor, I have realized that Loker students are not used to staggered lunches. That is, the entry of the next grade, at Loker, signified time to go, whereas HH has a rolling/staggered schedule where some enter and join others who still have time. Also, Loker kids are not used to lunch before recess. Therefore, they need time to realize that eating must occur first or they will be hungry later. They will quickly learn, as did HH kids, that skipping eating a full meal to rush outside, will cause them problems later in the day. They also did not realize that you can skip the line when only purchasing milk. I observed a very orderly, full (but not overcrowded) lunchroom where monitors were reminding kids to eat and fully in charge of who is finished and who should stay. A child was reminded of timeframes (warned that time was running out) because this child had sat socializing with lunchbox closed for quite some time. Certainly they might go home and say that they only had 10minutes for lunch!
    Wow, it really is the fault of the Loker kids. How could they not realize that sacrificing some/all of recess to make sure there is enough time to eat lunch is the "HH way." I would hate to have a situation where you both have proper time for lunch AND recess. To be fair, the CH kids still have that and the HH kids would have had that had Loker been used instead of HH. Why worry about those details , though. Let's just live with the compromised situation instead.

    "the kindergarten bus took 1 1/2 hours!"
    Depends when you start the clock. Some days teachers brought kids out to buses at 11:50 in order to start the loading process (each child checked off prior to getting on all 4 buses). A bus may then leave at 12:20. There were many stops where parents were not there yet b/c the time had been later the days prior. This causes delays while the driver and dispatcher try to reach the parent. Much training is needed for the kids who are new to bussing. They are slow to exit, need help/reminder to take belongings and are very distracted at this new experience. After the route, the bus returned to Loker to drop the volunteer monitor. You can paint the picture as a 45 minute bus ride or 1 1/2 hours, depending on how you count. Yes, they are long, but I'd rather my daughter have a long busride and great teachers/programs. This too, will only get better each day as the kids and drivers become more familiar and Admin. adjusts routes and times.
    I wonder who, besides Tracey, thinks it is completely acceptable for it to take 30 minutes to load 5-year old kids on a bus and then have them ride for up to 45 minutes or more. Geez, talk about trying to paint the grey sky blue. Hey CH parents, are you as happy as Tracey is about the massive increase in commute time for your little kindergarteners?

    "the drop-off/pickup at HH is disorganized and unsafe"
    HH certainly could've done a better job explaining details such as outdoor recess at drop-off, IN/OUT recess signs, etc., no pickup until reaching the dumpster, etc. It's strange how you don't realize that it is done any other way and that other Waylanders just "know" these things--our bad--we did alot of orienting, but seem to have forgotten some points that would've been very helpful to know ahead of time. Many of the comments heard at our new parent PTO mtg were things about not realizing you could park at the top of the hill and walk down to avoid getting stuck in dismissal tie ups. Also, it was unclear that when people go through the "live" lane they are not always cutting, but may be parking to go in (and yes, some cut and need to be told not to). People also didn't realize that your child shouldn't walk beyond the dumpster (now changed to the caf. door) to your car in line. At Loker I learned that there is a white line painted as a guide to kids and parents of how far they can go on the curb (great idea btw and maybe HH should do the same?). My point is, every year there are new parents who come to learn these "tricks of the trade" as the year progresses...sometimes takes a couple of years to truly understand how best to navigate pickup! What I see at HH and Loker, everyday, is caring staff doing their best to be flexible and patient during the learning curve and process adjustments (and readjustments!). It will def. take some time for all to understand the process and align with new ways of doing things. In the meantime, I have not seen children unsafe and certainly would not bring my child to any school if I felt it was not safe.
    Hmmm, I think it was great how three sixth graders were directing traffic at HH last week. Clever use of resources. And yes, maybe during those "couple of years" that it takes to understand the pickup, we may lose a few kids along the way and most definitely clog up our neighborhoods with more traffic and resulting pollution. Price of change, I guess. The above synopsis of pickup borders on some of the most irresponsible, excuse-laden dribble ever written on the subject of the reconfiguarion. Michael Abend certainly predicted what is happening, and the SC chose to ignore that expert analysis.

    I am thankful for Administrations tireless efforts and flexibility--I hear them saying they made mistakes on bus routes/start/end times. Changing back the school hours occurred quickly and reasonably and says to me, that Admin. is responsive and accountable. I am not inferring that this has not been difficult or without problems, but please understand that people are quick to say the elementary schools aren't working well, when really the most important piece, our amazing teachers, are working wonders. I respect the people who searched their souls to make decisions which have saved our wonderful teachers and great programs and class sizes (yes, there were more sections above recommended guidelines last year than this year! Another interesting point I recently found out was that we probably avoided adding a Kindy teacher by consolidating them all together and "topping off" each class). These buildings have seen higher numbers and being close to, at, or one above the max of Wayland's class size guidelines, does not mean we are OVERcrowded.
    We live in a town with amongst the highest tax rate in the state. We have seen consistent overrides passed here every couple of years and have seen a corresponding degredation of our school system. We went from three schools and a very harmonious community to two packed schools and parents who went form never raising a grouse during their time in Wayland to becoming viruently anti-School Committee and anti-school administration.

    What spin! We didn't avoid adding a K teacher. There was a "phantom" K teacher in last year's budget that was "cut" from this year's budget because that position was never used.

    Also, we didn't keep class sizes and all our great programs. We have two packed buildings with some classes over size, we lost things like Monday meeting at Loker which was a fantastic element of this community, book buddies for Kindergarteners are probably a thing of the past (along with the integration of these students with their brothers and sisters until Grade 1), and we did it all to "get the override passed" as Jeff D. notes again in this thread.

    As for the administration, they took virtually no care in constructing the bus system. Any fourth grader could have realized that the bus routes and the change in ES times were impossible even on the sunniest of days with no traffic at all. Changing the times was the result of POOR planning, and the admission of error is not commendble, it is the only acceptable course of action. See my post about the non-response to the still open question of when the busses will come Monday morning. These folks can't get out of their own way on the bussing issue.

    Yes, we have wonderful teachers. These folks have been more than graceful in their adaptation to the system. That is all I can agree with above.

    We took the jewel of our town and devalued it while paying more for the privilege. It is both a shame and a black mark on our community. Of course, we can reverse course by putting things back the way they were. I won't hold my breath, though. I, for one, would gladly pay my share of the miniscule amount of money we shaved from the budget (and the net number will be nowhere closed to the purported savings quoted in the Spring) for this result.

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